ECU Security Research Institute

Edith Cowan University
ECU-SRI Security Congress

2014 SRI Security Congress
"Security on the Move"

1-3 December, 2014
Perth, Western Australia

Keynote Speakers

David Campbell

David Campbell

Director, CERT Australia

Abstract: Cyber security – getting down to business

CERT Australia is the national computer emergency response team.

We are the point of contact in Government for cyber security issues affecting major Australian businesses, providing advice and support on cyber threats and vulnerabilities.

With the number and sophistication of cyber security incidents on the rise – keeping ahead of the game is a constant challenge for our technical and professional experts.

Speaker biography

David has worked in Government security for the past fifteen years, and has held a range of positions related to electronic and cyber security. He developed the Defence Signals Directorate’s Infosec-Registered Assessor Program and managed Australia’s participation in the first International Cyber Storm exercise in 2006, and has participated in the Cyber Storm 2, 3 and 4 exercises. David led the Australian Government Computer Emergency Readiness Team (GovCERT.au) as part of the Attorney-General’s Department, for four years. David has been in his current role as Director - CERT Australia, the national computer emergency response team, for the past five years. David has a Masters degree from the Australian National University, and is an Adjunct Associate Professor within Edith Cowan University’s Security Research Institute.

Jeffrey Malone

Jeffrey Malone

Senior Analyst, Defence Science and Technology Organisation

Abstract: Achieving Security on the Move in Defence: A Symphonia Securitas in Five Movements

Achieving acceptable INFOSEC outcomes in any enterprise is an inherently complex and challenging undertaking. The specific circumstances faced by the Australian Department of Defence (‘Defence’) – to varying extents – produces additional challenges beyond those faced by a typical private or public enterprise. That said, such additional challenges might arguably characterised as ones of degree rather than genuinely uniqueness. Specifically, the INFOSEC challenges faced by Defence ought not be overstated on the basis of uncontested (and incontestable) special pleading.

In this paper, I provide an overview of the INFOSEC challenges posed by Defence’s operating environment. Reflecting the theme of this year’s Congress – ‘Security on the Move’ – the paper employs the orchestral metaphor of a symphony in five movements. The paper examines the consequences of ‘movement’ in data, networks, technology, threats and people for the conduct of INFOSEC in the Defence environment. The paper closes with some concluding remarks on the genuine distinctiveness – or otherwise – of the INFOSEC challenges faced by Defence.

Speaker biography

Jeff Malone is a career national security professional who has held appointments in the Australian Army, the private sector, the public sector, and academia.  He holds a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) and Masters degrees in Political Science, and is currently completing a PhD on the reception, incorporation and employment of Information Operations by the Australian Defence Force (ADF).

During his service in the Australian Army (where he remains a member of the Standby Reserve), Jeff was intimately involved in the acceptance of Information Operations by the Australian Defence Force.  This included the development of the ADF's first published joint Information Operations doctrine, and the redesign of the ADF Warfare Centre's joint Information Operations Staff Officers' Course.  Jeff was the principal Australian contributor to Information Operations:  The Hard Reality of Soft Power, which was the textbook for the US joint information operations course conducted at the Joint Forces Staff College, Norfolk, and also for courses conducted within the US intelligence community.  For his work relating to Information Operations, Jeff was appointed the Chief of Defence Force Fellow in 2003.

During his work in the private sector, Jeff was involved in the development of the 2005 and 2007 Network Centric Warfare Roadmaps for the ADF.  These documents provided the strategic guidance and conceptual underpinning for the transformation of the ADF into a network-enabled force.  He was also a contributor to the training needs analysis for the ADF's Counter-IED Task Force, with a personal focus on the introduction into service of land force protection countermeasures systems.

Since 2007, Jeff has held a number of appointments in the public sector, including work on communications sector critical infrastructure protection, and transportation sector security.  At present, Jeff is a Senior Analyst in the Defence Science and Technology Organisation, undertaking analytical work on the technical maturity of defence systems, in support of the capability development and acquisition processes.

Jeff has held academic appointments at the University of Western Australia (School of Politics and International Relations), Queensland University of Technology (School of Justice Studies, Intelligence and Security Program) and the University of New South Wales – Australian Defence Force Academy (School of Engineering and Information Technology, where he is presently the unit controller of the Information Operations unit).  He has published extensively on Information Operations, critical infrastructure protection, IT security, and other national security issues.

Roger Bradbury

Roger Bradbury

National Security College, Australian National University

Abstract: What do states want … in cyberspace?

The existence of cyberspace – a new domain in which nation-states interact – allows us to see the problem of the state with fresh eyes because, in cyberspace, we are freed from some of the clutter of geography and the static of history that turn analysis away from the rigour of science towards the anecdote of the humanities. By taking a sociobiological perspective we can see states as complex adaptive systems that have emerged from simpler collectives. By taking a Darwinian perspective, we can see such emergent systems, while not fully Darwinian, interacting in ways that reveal their primary goals and perhaps their optimal sets of strategies. We can see, in fact, an ecology of cyberspace. And, finally, by mapping those insights back into states' traditional domains of land and sea, air and space, we may see anew, and be surprised by, what states really want.

Speaker biography

Roger Bradbury is a Professor and Director (Academic, Research & Outreach) in the National Security College at the Australian National University, and a Fellow in the CSIRO Centre for Complex Systems Science. He leads the interdisciplinary and international Strategy and Statecraft in Cyberspace program at the College. He also advises on international science and technology issues for the Office of National Assessments. He has a background in the modelling and analysis of complex systems and is currently particularly interested in the complex strategic interactions between states in cyberspace.

Jason Brown

Jason Brown

National Security Director, Thales in Australian and New Zealand

Abstract: Security's role in building enterprise resilience

Jason is responsible for security liaison with government, law enforcement and intelligence communities to develop cooperative arrangements to minimise risk to Thales and those in the community that it supports.  He is also responsible to ensure compliance with international and Commonwealth requirements for national security and relevant federal and state laws.

Before joining Thales in 2004 Jason had 27 years' experience in Commonwealth Government with appointments which include Assistant Secretary-Defence Imagery and the Geospatial Organisation, Director General - Safety, Compensation and People Development, Assistant Secretary - Defence Security, and various appointments in the Attorney General's Security portfolio in the areas of counter terrorism and security policy and investigations.

Jason has a number of publications in the areas of client service, intelligence management and security.  He is internationally known speaker in the areas of intelligence, security, innovation, export control, scenario and strategic planning.  He is a Fellow of the British Security Institute and ARPI, a member of ASIS International, the National Gallery of Australia Foundation, the Risk Management Institution of Australasia and University House – Australian National University. He holds Security Professional Chartered status in the UK and Registered Professional status with SPR-A.  He was awarded the Australian Security Medal for Conspicuous Service in February 2011.  In 2013 IFSEC International recognised him in the top 40 influential persons in Security and Fire Management.

Speaker biography

Roger Bradbury is a Professor and Director (Academic, Research & Outreach) in the National Security College at the Australian National University, and a Fellow in the CSIRO Centre for Complex Systems Science. He leads the interdisciplinary and international Strategy and Statecraft in Cyberspace program at the College. He also advises on international science and technology issues for the Office of National Assessments. He has a background in the modelling and analysis of complex systems and is currently particularly interested in the complex strategic interactions between states in cyberspace.

Contact Details

Emma Burke
Congress Coordinator
sri@ecu.edu.au
(61 8) 6304 5176

Important Dates

Paper Submission Deadline
30 September 2014

Acceptance Notification
24 October 2014

Camera Ready Papers
3 November 2014

Early Bird Registration
2 November 2014

Supporters

  • Australian Computer Society
  • Australian Security Magazine
  • CISCO

Sponsors

  • Edith Cowan University